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Lincoln Institute
of Public Opinion Research, Inc.

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Harrisburg, PA 17112

Phone: (717) 671-0776
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Supreme Court, Terrorism Top Concerns

by Policy Brief
 

Pennsylvania's delegation to the 2016 Republican National Convention rated U.S. Supreme Court nominations, terrorism and protecting constitutional rights as the most important issues facing the nation while viewing the GOP-controlled congress as having failed to effectively counter the policies of President Barack Obama.

The Lincoln Institute's quadrennial survey of delegates and alternate delegates found economic issues outweighed social issues and foreign affairs in their selection of a presidential candidate, but 60% said a combination of all three issue sets factored into their decision.

That was reflected in the importance given to the various issues facing the nation. No social issues topped the delegation's list of important issues. A clear concern over fundamental rights emerged from the survey data as the selection of nominees to the U.S. Supreme Court topped the importance scale with 90% saying the seating of justices was a very important issue. Concerns over ISIS/terrorism rated as second most important, but protecting constitutional rights followed closely as the delegation's third most important area of concern. Jobs and the economy, the budget deficit/government spending and illegal immigration rounded out the top concerns.

Pennsylvania's delegation hues to traditional Republican positions on President Obama's job performance. Eighty-seven percent say his administration's foreign policies have made the United States much less secure; only one delegate thought those policies have made the nation more secure. When asked if President Obama was on the right track or wrong track in responding to the threat of ISIS and international terrorism there was unanimity — 100% said wrong track. Until the threat of ISIS/terrorism has ended, 64% of the delegation thinks the U.S. should ban entry of citizens from countries that are hotbeds of terrorist activity; 26% want to ban all Muslims from entering the country; 13% say current laws are sufficient. Eighty-nine percent of the delegates/alternate delegates strongly disapprove of the Obama Administration's nuclear deal with Iran, another 8% somewhat disapprove. Only 3% expressed approval.

When asked if the U.S. economy is on the right track or off in the wrong direction 97% said wrong direction. Ninety-two percent of the Pennsylvania delegation to the Republican National Convention places the blame for the nation's economic ills on President Obama, but majorities also fault labor unions and congress. There is strong support, 72% with another 26% somewhat supporting lowering tax rates as a means of stimulating economic growth.

The delegation, reflecting the views of its presumptive presidential nominee, opposes free trade agreements such as the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP). Sixty-nine percent oppose TPP with 31% expressing strong opposition. In terms of balancing the federal budget, 79% would do so only by cutting spending; 21% would employ a combination of tax hikes and spending cuts. Concern was voiced over the viability of the Social Security system: 57% think the system will be around for future generations — but only with substantial changes. Forty percent think Social Security is headed to bankruptcy; only 4% think it will survive without changes. To provide for the nation's energy needs, 93% favor more domestic drilling as a solution; 50% support development of alternative fuels and 30% urge conservation.

Illegal immigration has been a dominate issue in Donald Trump's presidential campaign. The Pennsylvania delegation to the Republican national convention reflects his stance on the issue. Fifty-six percent of the delegation wants immediate deportation of illegal aliens; 23% would accept granting permanent worker status. Not a single delegate favors granting illegal aliens full citizenship.

Also spurring Donald Trump's march to the Republican Presidential nomination was grassroots frustration with the ineffectiveness of the party's elected officials in Washington, D.C. Eighty percent of the Pennsylvania delegation said the Republican-controlled congress has been ineffective at checking President Obama's executive power.

As a result, over two-thirds hold a negative view of the job being done by the U.S. Senate and the U.S. House of Representatives.

A strong anti-government thread is woven into the state's delegation as 97% said they view the federal government as an adversarial force when it comes to helping solve problems. Only two delegates view the federal government as a positive force. Likewise, 97% say our basic rights as Americans are God-given; only two delegates view our rights as granted to us by government.

State Issues

The Lincoln Institute's survey of delegates/alternate delegates to the 2016 Republican National Convention found 92% want Republicans in the general assembly to continue holding the line on more spending and higher taxes. Ironically, those views were expressed as the GOP-controlled legislature approved a state budget which dramatically increased spending and included a wide array of tax hikes. Ninety-six percent agree with the strategy — now abandoned by Republican legislative leaders — that cost drivers like pension reform should be addressed before the general assembly considers any increase in taxes.

Sixty-five percent of the delegation feels the property tax-based system currently utilized by school districts, local and county governments to fund services is unfair to taxpayers. There is little agreement though on how to otherwise raise revenue. Twenty percent favor a higher state sales tax rate while 16% would support a more broad based state sales tax at the current rate. There was nominal support for local sales taxes, local earned income taxes or a higher state income tax. On a related note, 61% favor allowing vouchers or grants to students who wish to attend a public school in a district other than their own, 32% do not.

Generally speaking, 60% of the delegates/alternate delegates think the state income tax rate is too high, another 41% say it is about right. Eighty-seven percent feel state business taxes are too high, only 13% think taxes on business are about right. When it comes to economic development, 96% favor having the state cut business taxes and regulation. Just 4% favor having the state borrow money to help select business ventures.

There is strong support among Pennsylvania's delegation for a Right to Work Law, which means that a worker cannot be fired or kept from having a job for either joining or not joining a labor union. Eighty-five percent favor the adoption of a right to work law. On a related issue, 76% support enacting a ban on public school teacher strikes.

Delegation Composition

Pennsylvania's delegation to the Republican National Convention is a very conservative one. Forty percent say they are very conservative, another 47% say they are somewhat conservative. Thirteen percent proclaimed themselves to be moderates, and one delegate adopted the very liberal/progressive title.

The delegation is skewed to higher age demographics. About a third are over the age of 65, another third between the ages of 50-65. Twenty-eight percent fall in the 30-50 age group, while only one respondent was under 30. Of the delegates responding to the survey invitation 62% are male, 38% female.

Methodology

The Lincoln Institute survey of delegates/alternate delegates to the 2016 Republican National Convention was conducted electronically between June 28 and July 14. 2016. A total of 73 delegates/alternate delegates participated in the survey. Complete numeric results are available on-line at www.lincolninstitute.org.